COMMENT: Editorial; End the decision-making lottery

Squabbles break out every time Lottery funds are awarded. Populist causes claim there is an elitist bias, small organisations complain that larger groups get the lion’s share, and vice versa.

Squabbles break out every time Lottery funds are awarded. Populist

causes claim there is an elitist bias, small organisations complain that

larger groups get the lion’s share, and vice versa.



In tackling these various complaints, the Lottery boards need to

consider their own public relations. If their deliberations were more

transparent there might be more widespread public understanding and

support for their decisions. Instead, the current set-up gives the

impression that the allocation of awards is nothing more than, er, a

lottery.



Of course, greater transparency might also lead to complaints that

applicants who are better at lobbying are more successful. But good

causes have always had to rely on PR and lobbying Disappointed punters

tearing up their tickets on a Saturday night will never know why their

number did not come up. But they should be entitled to find out why

their pounds 1 stake did not go to their favourite charity. Until they

do, every round of awards will be a PR headache for the Lottery.



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