DIARY: Winning the marketing gamble by placing your bets on the nose

We all know supermarkets are expert at luring us with eye-catching displays of fresh fruit and veg. Asda’s egg aisle even has the sound of clucking hens. But smells?

We all know supermarkets are expert at luring us with eye-catching

displays of fresh fruit and veg. Asda’s egg aisle even has the sound of

clucking hens. But smells?



Defenceless consumers will now have to cope with Aromagas, ‘a mould-

breaking marketing opportunity for retailers’ from the UK industrial gas

manufacturer BOC.



BOC is offering linen smells for shirt-makers, soapy niffs for chemists

and the pong of leather for furniture showrooms. Apparently the dry

cleaning chain Sketchley has already trailed an alpine whiff, and

Woolies released the smell of mince pies and brandy in its stores last

Christmas.



But it was Anita Roddick who discovered the marketing potential of

smells way back in 1976. In order to lure customers into her first damp-

ridden Brighton store the Body Shop founder sprinkled a 100 yard perfume

trail along the pavement in through the door.



Now, 20 years later The Body Shop has its own ‘corporate smell’, worn by

its staff and sprayed in its 1,400 worldwide stores. Ahh, the sweet

smell of success.



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