What The Papers Say: Charitable solution has little pulling power

Alliterative company descriptions are a useful shorthand for a host of corporate messages. Nationwide’s rise to become ’Britain’s biggest building society’ has been aided by those who previously ranked higher being determined to become small or medium-sized banks. The FT and the Guardian insisted on inserting the qualification ’remaining’ into the newly-acquired title.

Alliterative company descriptions are a useful shorthand for a host

of corporate messages. Nationwide’s rise to become ’Britain’s biggest

building society’ has been aided by those who previously ranked higher

being determined to become small or medium-sized banks. The FT and the

Guardian insisted on inserting the qualification ’remaining’ into the

newly-acquired title.



Coverage of its ’carpetbagger solution’ - insisting that any future

windfalls were irrevocably pledged to charity - provided the Nationwide

with another window of opportunity to underline its determination to

remain a traditional mutual building society.



However, those who recalled the summer uprising, led by butler Michael

Hardern, still foresaw eventual capitulation, perhaps as early as July

1998. The revolt, analysed in What The Papers Say (27 June 1997),

produced over twice the coverage - proving a good ’Did the Butler Do

It?’ story has more pulling power than one de-bagging the

carpetbaggers.



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA International. Cuttings supplied by The

Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What The Papers Say’ can be found at:

www.carma.com.



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