CAMPAIGNS: Judge and Jury; Sponsorship gives the right impressionist at the Tate

Has the tremendous pre-publicity for the Cezanne exhibition been so successful that the hype has overshadowed the sponsor, asks Bill Kallaway of Kallaway Limited

Has the tremendous pre-publicity for the Cezanne exhibition been so

successful that the hype has overshadowed the sponsor, asks Bill Kallaway of Kallaway Limited



Over 350,000 people are expected to push through the Tate Gallery doors

to see London’s latest blockbusting exhibition - Cezanne. Hyped by the

critics, applauded by the public, it has generated any number of

opportunists chasing the cash - including Pret A Manger’s Cezannewich.



Has the exhibition’s sponsor, Ernst & Young, been trampled in the rush?

Analysis of our own in-house cuttings covering the launch might suggest

so - less than 50 per cent mentioned Ernst & Young - a constant and

ongoing problem for all major exhibition sponsors. Of course, it gives

the firm’s partners ‘real grief’ admits James Hudson, Ernst & Young’s

Sponsorship Director, ‘but we are delighted with the hype’. It brings an

extra edge to the value of their guest tickets, adding the feeling that

it could be one of the ‘hottest’ in town.



Reaching their target audience is the sponsor’s prime objective. Forty

events will be held in the gallery, from dinner parties for 16 up to

receptions for several hundred. Over 5,000 carefully chosen guests will

be entertained. The sponsorship cost, by my estimation, will be in the

region of pounds 1 million - split broadly 50/50 between straight

sponsorship to the Gallery and direct event promotion - including the

current 12-sheet Underground campaign and the forthcoming bus T-sides

and radio ads. All giving prominent exposure to Ernst & Young. The

sponsor has undertaken a cost per head evaluation - a figure by my

calculation which could average out on the target audience of pounds 200

per head.



There can be no doubt of the event’s success. It serves two masters -

for the arts world it maintains London’s position on the international

circuit for major exhibitions - for which the sponsor has been publicly

acknowledged. For Ernst & Young, the exhibition reaches their primary

audience on a one-to-one privileged basis - cocooned at the heart of the

hype - leaving the rest of the public to enjoy the exhibition and the

froth. Had Cezanne been alive today, he’d still have needed the support

of Ernst &Young - as a financial adviser.



Has the company been lost in the rush? Certainly not for the chosen

5,000 and also probably not for the greater majority of the wider public

interested in the visual arts. Ernst &Young may not have received all

the column inches they may have expected; they may not be overwhelmed by

an influx of new business from the street. But they will have achieved

the more valuable objective of focused person-to-person contact in a

creative environment which automatically benefits perceptions of the

sponsoring company. Unlike newsprint, the effect of this communication

endures.



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