CAMPAIGNS: Kids in education are Army targets - Youth Marketing

Bringing business and education together to increase brand awareness is difficult. To fill a need in the curriculum, while meeting the business objectives is even harder. This is the challenge facing the British Army as it attempts to boost recruitment among young people.

Bringing business and education together to increase brand

awareness is difficult. To fill a need in the curriculum, while meeting

the business objectives is even harder. This is the challenge facing the

British Army as it attempts to boost recruitment among young people.



The British Army has been working with education business strategists

Education and Youth (E&Y) since 1992. The latest initiative, School

Challenger, focused on introducing the British Army to students through

outdoor activies and through the school curriculum.



Objectives



Education and Youth were appointed to create a programme that fitted

within the British Army’s recruitment strategy. It had to define the

values of the modern British Army for local secondary schools and

further education colleges. The target audience was primarily

opinion-formers, including secondary school teachers and careers

advisers. The object was to establish a relationship with them, so that

they would provide an unbiased view of the British Army as a career

choice to their 13-to-19-year-old, full-time students.



Tactics



The Army identified areas of the curriculum that were relevant to army

skills and found history, maths and geography as areas where the Army

could fill a gap.



E&Y called upon experts to put together branded education packs. The Map

Pack consisted of ordinance survey maps, satellite images and aerial

photographs, with overlapping co-ordinates so that students could see

different ways to interpret a geographic area. The Maths Pack helped

students interpret technical drawings. The History Pack looked at

strategy as well as the history of war.



The School Challenger programme also provided a helpline to support the

needs of teachers and career advisers throughout the UK. Teachers could

request more information, extend an invitation to Army personnel to talk

to the schools or to arrange for school field trips.



The students benefiting from the Army packs were able to interpret the

army culture and to understand the intellectual and physical challenges

of army life. In addition to the packs, E&Y invited students to

experience army culture and teamwork along with the outdoor

lifestyle.



Approximatetly 15 per cent of the budget was devoted to research and

evaluation.



Results



A two-way dialogue has developed between the British Army and 15,000

schools. It has communicated positive messages to a crucial

audience.



The British Army believes that its role and functions are better

understood as a result of the campaign.



As for media coverage, extensive local radio and newspaper publicity has

been achieved. The BBC has covered events, along with commercial radio

and a broad spectrum of newspapers, including the Manchester Evening

News, the Yorkshire Evening Post, the Northern Echo and the Camden New

Journal.



Verdict



When the project first started, there was some reluctance by school

opinion formers to recommend the Army as a career move. The training

packs and events have put the Army in a better position to communicate

its messages on a local and national level. As a result, many more

activities are created on behalf of the British Army than were possible

a few years ago.



Careers advisers and teachers are arranging work experience during

holidays or weekends with the British Army to enable school children to

gain first hand experience. Teachers, careers advisers and children are

increasingly seeing the British Army as a useful training tool both in

and outside the classroom.



E&J is currently preparing for its next programme, Pathfinder, which

aims to encourage school children to take their soon-to-be compulsory

work-placement with the British Army.



Client: British Army

PR Team: Education and Youth (E&Y)

Campaign: School Challenger

Timescale: Spring 1996 to December 1997

Cost: Undisclosed



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