Nike to push message on sweat shop clean up

Nike’s PR manager Graham Anderson has admitted that the leading sports shoe manufacturer has failed to properly communicate its attempts to clean up its ethical record, prior to this Saturday’s Worldwide Day of Action against sweatshop labour.

Nike’s PR manager Graham Anderson has admitted that the leading

sports shoe manufacturer has failed to properly communicate its attempts

to clean up its ethical record, prior to this Saturday’s Worldwide Day

of Action against sweatshop labour.



Anderson told PR Week that the company has not conveyed its

anti-exploitation actions proactively enough, but says Nike is working

hard to address the issue.



Last month Nike announced that it had severed its links with four

Indonesian-based factories which failed to fulfil its working conditions

requirements.



It was the first company to have a code of conduct in 1992, and this

year invited US Senator Andrew Young to visit supplying factories and

publish his findings.



Adidas spokesman Peter Csanadi feels that individual codes of conduct

have limited power. ’It doesn’t solve the problem, it just relocates it

either geographically or into other industries.’



Csanadi argues that Adidas’ responsibility is to ensure that the laws of

the country are fully observed by suppliers. He says the company has yet

to be directly accused of worker exploitation.



Nike has taken the brunt of criticism of the industry, mainly because

the media has focused on the contrast between low wages and the high

profile sponsorship deals it brokers with sports stars like Michael

Jordan.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in