MEDIA: PROFILE; Decor for the creme de la creme: Tyler Brule, editor-in- chief and founder, Wallpaper

New independent magazines are fairly common, but few people try launching a glossy, high-quality style and design magazine without the weight of a big publishing company behind them.

New independent magazines are fairly common, but few people try

launching a glossy, high-quality style and design magazine without the

weight of a big publishing company behind them.



Unfazed, 27-year-old Canadian Tyler Brule has done just that. The first

issue of the bi-monthly Wallpaper hit newsstands two weeks ago screaming

class, impeccable contacts, and top-notch advertising on each of its 162

pages.



There isn’t an inch of chintz to be found in any of the immaculately

styled pages which credit the manufacturers for every product used in

the shoots, including the shirts on the back of the models reclining in

designer chairs and the Harvey Nichols designer food. Everyone gets a

mention.



Wallpaper is a celebrity-free zone - no houses of the rich and famous

here - except of course for editor-in-chief Brule’s whose lounge room is

featured on page 69. Indeed, it was his Chelsea house that inspired the

launch of Wallpaper. The idea came to Brule when he spent a year

recovering from gunshot wounds he received in both arms while covering a

popular culture story on Medecin Sans Frontiers in Afghanistan.



‘I was sitting at home recovering, flicking through magazines and there

was nothing that talked to me - I didn’t have dogs, a Range Rover parked

in the drive, I didn’t live in the country - apart from Elle Decoration

there was very little that appealed,’ he says. ‘There were a lot of gaps

in the market, but I thought I could fill them with one magazine.

Wallpaper is for people in their 30s who have a cupboard full of the

right clothes, but who are more interested in their environment than

what they wear.’



The ravages of Afghanistan seems a long way from the excess of a style

magazine. But Brule has packed a lot into his seven years in journalism,

carving out a niche as a popular culture writer on issues as wide

ranging as Beirut, the Paris and Milan fashion show and Russian

prostitutes in Dubai.



Brule dropped out of Toronto College, where he was studying political

science and journalism, to take a job on BBC 2’s Reportage as a

researcher. His six months was followed by other short stints, including

Elle and, significantly, series editor of a design and popular culture

programme on European Business News. ‘It was an amazing time to

network,’ he says.



Future issues will be beefed up with popular culture reportage and more

travel pages, because he ‘feels cheated by the two to three travel pages

in Vogue’. He has no plans to go monthly, believing that a 200 page bi-

monthly gives readers ‘something to look forward to’. He also wants his

company, Wallpaper Media, to become an international brand and says he

is interested in moving into contract publishing.



For a man used to changing country and jobs every couple of months,

Brule admits that being saddled with a company and staff is ‘quite

terrifying and a frightening responsibility’. The burden should be eased

by having a magazine that allows him to exercise his passions of pop

culture writing, travel, food and interiors.



HIGHLIGHTS



1989 Reporter, Reportage

1990 Researcher, Good Morning America

1991 Bureau chief, London, Fox Television.

1992 Contributing editor, Elle

1995 Series editor, EBN

1996 Founder and editor-in-chief, Wallpaper



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in