NEWS: Spin doctors thrive through ‘lazy journalism’

The rise of the spin doctor is as much a symptom of lazy journalism as it is of the communication needs of political parties, according to panellists at a round table conference on spin doctors this week.

The rise of the spin doctor is as much a symptom of lazy journalism as

it is of the communication needs of political parties, according to

panellists at a round table conference on spin doctors this week.



Hosted in London by US foundation The Freedom Forum, it debated the

relationship between political communicators and the media.



‘Spin doctors have emerged as a fascination for political commentators

as a sort of power behind the throne,’ said Dennis Kavanagh, professor

of politics at Liverpool University. ‘It’s the latest phase in what I

call lazy journalism.’



His comments were echoed by Sir Bernard Ingham. ‘The obsession with spin

doctors will only end when journalists recover their self confidence and

reveal the truth according to the facts rather than trying to get a

story in the paper or on air,’ said Ingham.



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