NEWS: Should PR reveal the real reasons for promoting a single currency?

As I am no longer young and spring is a long time coming, my Easter thoughts turned to a pretty little PR examination test: ‘You have been engaged to promote a single European currency. Please discuss’.

As I am no longer young and spring is a long time coming, my Easter

thoughts turned to a pretty little PR examination test: ‘You have been

engaged to promote a single European currency. Please discuss’.



By way of clarification, you have not been engaged to sell the Euro, as

it is called, to the sceptical British public. A single currency is the

subject of party political controversy in Britain. It is not therefore a

suitable case for promotion here, whether paid for with sterling or

ecus, unless, in the interests of stimulating public debate, the

Government were to give exactly the same sum to the antis to argue

against.



That’s not on in the foreseeable future. So, you will have to polish up

your German and French who do things differently. You will also have to

sell a single currency differently in different countries, which is not

exactly encouraging when the Euro is supposed to be the cement that

would bind the misnamed European Union. In Germany, for example, the

people, not to mention their canny bankers, are fearful lest the

Italians or Greeks get their profligate hands on the management of the

D-mark, alias the Euro. Already, the crafty are hedging their bets by

buying Swiss francs. (NB. the Swiss refused to touch the EC with a

bargepole.)



The French, for all their arrogance in believing that they can manage

the Germans, are wondering why so many should be put out of work by

trying to keep up economically with them through their franc fort, which

is the next worst thing to a single currency.



But these are only details. You will need to address yourselves to a

more basic question: why do we need a single currency? The conventional

answer is to facilitate a single market. But you don’t need a single

currency to do that. Years ago the British proposed a common currency -

the ecu - for dual use alongside pounds, pesetas etc.



It went down like a lead doubloon, even though a common currency could,

by common usage, have eventually become a single currency. Why? Because

it is gradualist, pragmatic and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl is in a

hurry. He is scared witless by his own people. He believes their

nationalism will march again unless it is sunk in a single Euro-state -

with, inevitably a single Euro currency.



So, the case for a single currency is not commercial or economic, it is

political. It is to put the Germans in a cage. Promoting a single

currency thus raises delicate ethical problems for PR companies such as

how to present the underlying truth? In the interests of PR’s

reputation, we had better keep a close eye on how they do it. After all,

we shall partly pay for it.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in