CAMPAIGNS: Judge and Jury: With the trial over, prepare for a Monica media overload - The President may have escaped impeachment, but the marketing of Monica is set to run and run, says Kizzi Nkwocha, director of Nkwocha and Associates

By the time Monica Lewinsky was approaching her twenties, she had a clear future mapped out for her. A BSc in psychology from Oregon’s well-heeled Lewis and Clarke College and she seemed on the road to a successful career, maybe even a husband with letters after his name.

By the time Monica Lewinsky was approaching her twenties, she had a

clear future mapped out for her. A BSc in psychology from Oregon’s

well-heeled Lewis and Clarke College and she seemed on the road to a

successful career, maybe even a husband with letters after his name.



After all, she was born in Beverly Hills, where children are raised to

expect the best. A different world from Washington, where her role in

the scandal of the century ultimately raised doubts about her integrity

and honesty.



Few could imagine, let alone survive, the media barrage unleashed on the

young intern whose pout became one of the most photographed of the

decade.



After years of silence, Monica turned to Andrew Norton to tell the

public her side of the story. And, following advice from her lawyers,

she recruited John Scanlon of DSFX International to take the edge out of

the media’s sting. But how, and why, market Monica?



With the public gorging on a daily diet of anti-Monica articles, Scanlon

had a monumental task on his hands. But ironically, the job is

relatively uncomplicated. In Monica’s case, media management isn’t about

convincing the public she is a woman more sinned against than sinning;

it isn’t about persuading a cynical audience that they should name their

unborn children after her. Media management here has just one simple

purpose: to convince the world it wants to hear Monica’s story.



Like Christine Keeler before her, Monica’s name has become synonymous

with scandal and betrayal. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. As

any PR person will tell you, it’s better to be looked over than

overlooked.



Scanlon has to deflect public apathy long enough to capitalise on book

sales, movie rights, and, yes, even product endorsement. Havana

anyone?



Any change of image - to capture the women’s vote, the sympathy of young

people, even the religious die-hards - should be specifically aimed at

increasing her earning potential. With the right guidance, Monica has

the ability to earn close to pounds 30 million through her story.



The sanctimonious columnists may decry this as cynical manipulation of

the story for Monica’s personal gain. And they would be right. As long

as the media has any interest in Monica, she will hear those cash tills

ringing.



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