Media Profile: New delivery from the milkman - Maggie Goodman, editor, Home and Life

Home and Life is a new women’s title. So far so normal. It’s a monthly glossy title. Again, par for the course. It costs about a pound, has fashion, travel and beauty features and can only be bought from the milkman. Yup, you heard right. The magazine can only be bought on the doorstep from the milkman. It’s a new concept - get your media with your milk.

Home and Life is a new women’s title. So far so normal. It’s a

monthly glossy title. Again, par for the course. It costs about a pound,

has fashion, travel and beauty features and can only be bought from the

milkman. Yup, you heard right. The magazine can only be bought on the

doorstep from the milkman. It’s a new concept - get your media with your

milk.



’I actually think you’ll see a lot more of this sort of thing,’ says

Home and Life editor Maggie Goodman. ’Sainsbury’s Magazine has carved

out its own distribution niche with a good product and, as competition

on the newsagent’s shelf increases, publishers are going to be looking

for new ways of reaching customers.’



The magazine was the brainchild of farmers’ co-operative Milk

Marque.



It sold the idea to publishers XL, which in turn approached Goodman. She

has had a long career in magazine publishing, starting as a sub-editor

on Honey and rising through the industry, taking on the launch

editorships of both Hello! and Company along the way. With Home and Life

she is attending the birth of her third title. So, is she some kind of

launch junkie?



’There is definitely something thrilling about being in at the start of

a new title,’ she agrees. ’You feel very protective towards your

launches.



It’s more exciting than taking over someone else’s chair. The great

thing about Home and Life is that I was given absolute freedom to

develop the magazine that I wanted rather than, as was the case with

Hello!, copying the Spanish edition.’



The magazine she wants is in the Options, She or Good Housekeeping

mould.



It has lots of food and recipes (’They’re not all about milk,’ Goodman

hastens to add) and fashion and beauty in the mid-market vein. Goodman

wants to make sure all the products are suitable for all sizes,

available nationally, affordable and attractive to women in their

30s.



’We’ve got too much stuff to put in, as is always the case with

magazines,’ says Goodman. ’There are not that many general features but

those that are there will cover health, current affairs and celebrity

interviews.



We’re going to have a ’Take Five Women’ feature every month which will

celebrate women’s success, although not in a heavy way. I also want lots

of stories about real people.’



Other regular sections include travel, leisure, motoring and personal

finance and the back page is graced by Vanessa Feltz. Goodman hopes for

a circulation of 450,000 a month which - given the fact that nine

million families get their milk delivered - seems less than

optimistic.



Now that one title has taken on the idea of innovative delivery systems,

does Goodman worry that rivals will take different routes to consumers’

doors. ’What, you mean handing out magazines via the postman or the

baker?’ she laughs. ’I suppose it’s possible. But the real issue is

quality. You can deliver people anything. The skill is getting them to

read it.’



HIGHLIGHTS

1979

Launch editor, Company

1988

Editor, Hello!

1993

Commissioning editor, Sunday Express

1994

Editor, New magazine development, National Magazine Company

1997

Editor, Home and Life



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