DIARY: He wants to live in a house, a very big house, in another country

Readers currently writhing on the house-buying rack should perhaps praise the Lord that, unlike Price Waterhouse’s Jeremy Wyatt, their purchase is unlikely to require papal dispensation.

Readers currently writhing on the house-buying rack should perhaps

praise the Lord that, unlike Price Waterhouse’s Jeremy Wyatt, their

purchase is unlikely to require papal dispensation.



Wyatt, PW’s European director of corporate communications, and his wife

Jennie have just forked out the lira for a 13th century pile in

Tuscany.



However, as the site includes a chapel, the Vatican has the right to

block the sale within 60 days.



Speaking to Wyatt on day 15, he was quite sanguine about his chances of

a papal blessing. ’It’s highly unlikely Rome will want to buy it,’ he

tells me. ’After all, they have got quite a few churches and chapels

around that way.’



Even if the Wyatts do get the go-ahead next month, they are unlikely to

spend much time sipping Chianti a casa this year.



’It really is a ruin: even with a fair wind, it will take us a year to

rebuild it,’ says Wyatt. ’The house was bombed by the British in the war

and hasn’t been lived in for 60 or 70 years. Parts of it have been

pulled down, because it’s unsafe. There are bits of floor sticking up in

the air and beams hanging down.



’Indeed, after we signed the deed of transfer, the notary, who

apparently couldn’t speak a word of English, turned to me and said - in

perfect English - ’You’re a very brave man’.’



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