THIS WEEK’S BIG QUESTION: What will be the big issue for 1999?

The ecomony, the digital revolution and devolution top the agenda for 1999.

The ecomony, the digital revolution and devolution top the agenda

for 1999.



Anthony Cardew, Cardew and Co



’Persuading the market to put a proper value on most quoted clients will

be the big challenge for financial PR companies in 1999. Low or neutral

inflation, possibly even minor deflation, will depress investment

enthusiasm.



For the same reason, the mergers and acquisitions market will be boosted

by takeover bids made by companies seeking earnings growth by buying

other companies at low prices. Small to medium-sized plcs will have to

fight to gain any normal investment interest at all.’



Karen Mander, Kazoo



’The challenge for the PR industry in 1999 is to broaden modes of

thinking. On an immediate level, consultants will need to become

literate in new media, and able to communicate effectively across the

different technological platforms. Agencies will also need to keep pace

with the changing face of a global broadcast industry and the

dissemination of information in light of the digital revolution.’



James Maxwell, Ketchum



’Everything hinges on one thing - business confidence. It is

ridiculously low considering the level of interest rates. We have talked

ourselves into recession, and only we can get ourselves out of it. If

clients and consultancies can keep energy levels high and attitudes

positive, we will trade ourselves out of difficulty. I believe that

millennium fever will provide the required boost from the spring onwards

and that 2000 will be a great year for business.’



Kleshna Handel, Manning Selvage and Lee



’We’ll need to discipline ourselves not to over-use or abuse the ’M’

word (millennium for anyone who doesn’t yet realise!). There is a small

chance that too many people can jump on a good bandwagon and it then

loses balance and lacks currency for anyone.’



Mike Lee, Westminster Strategy



’The biggest challenge is likely to be the effect of new decision-making

bodies in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and London. British politics

is moving into a new era and it will be vital to be able to deal with

new tiers of decision-making. Public affairs consultancies are going to

have to be able to deliver not only in London and Brussels, but across

the UK and also on an international basis.’



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in