What The Papers Say: Ridicule is all in a day’s work for Diageo

The unveiling of Diageo as the name for the Guinness/ GrandMet merger provided an ideal opportunity for commentators and writers to heap scorn not only on the name but on the process.

The unveiling of Diageo as the name for the Guinness/ GrandMet

merger provided an ideal opportunity for commentators and writers to

heap scorn not only on the name but on the process.



Only Amanda Hall in the Sunday Telegraph took the time to talk at length

to corporate identity experts Wolff Olins about how they arrived at the

unlikely nomenclature. The Times and the Guardian took delight in

correcting seven reports that perpetuated the Evening Standard’s

explanation that the word was derived from ’dia’, the Latin word for day

while, as both papers pointed out, the Latin for day is in fact

’dies’.



The Diageo management was well prepared for the derision. They clearly

expected that financial performance would eventually win the doubters

round. No doubt epithets such as ’abominable’ - ’Esperanto-esque’ - and

(from the Sun) ’barmy’ will continue to be attached to the name that

prompted one Guinness drinker, polled by the Sunday Telegraph, to

exclaim: ’Oh please, not another Terence Conran restaurant!’



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA International. Cuttings supplied by The

Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What The Papers Say’ can be found at:

www.carma.com.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in