What The Papers Say: Government bogged down by the countryside

The Government emerged in the press as making the best of a bad job over Sunday’s Countryside March. The defence of a narrow cause, fox-hunting, had ballooned into a mass movement, which left politicians on the back foot. The Prime Minister’s One Nation vision for town and country and for rich and poor was looking ragged at the edges. Some editorial writers said Labour was too pro-metropolitan, with too few roots in this green and pleasant land.

The Government emerged in the press as making the best of a bad job

over Sunday’s Countryside March. The defence of a narrow cause,

fox-hunting, had ballooned into a mass movement, which left politicians

on the back foot. The Prime Minister’s One Nation vision for town and

country and for rich and poor was looking ragged at the edges. Some

editorial writers said Labour was too pro-metropolitan, with too few

roots in this green and pleasant land.



Rural sentimentality in certain media, dreaming of the ’birth of the

revival of romanticism’ (Express on Sunday), was countered by

commentators looking at the bottom line. The FT said that taxpayers,

after all, stumped up 120 per cent of the countryside’s wage bill, so

the countryside had to be accountable to the Government. The Daily

Star’s take on the economics was: ’Most country people live off the fat

of the land. What the fox their prob?’ Mandelson will have his work cut

out for him if the Government is to plough its way through this one.



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA International. Cuttings supplied by The

Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What The Papers Say’ can be found at:

www.carma.com.



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