WWF hires duo to work on Climate Change Bill

WWF-UK has added to its lobbying firepower as it steps up its efforts to persuade the Government to ­include transport targets in the Climate Change Bill.

The wildlife charity has created two positions dedicated to transport policy, amid concern that there are currently no targets for the aviation and shipping industries to reduce emissions in the Bill.

Peter Lockley joins as head of transport policy, having recently quit his post as head of policy development at the Aviation Environment Federation. Jean Leston takes on the role of transport policy officer at WWF-UK, joining from the Women’s Environmental Network.

Both join the now six-strong climate change team and report to Keith Allott, head of the climate change programme at WWF. Their responsibilities include lobbying for emissions from international aviation and shipping to be included in the Bill.

Allott said: ‘Since 1990, greenhouse gas emissions from aviation have doubled. New capacity to focus on this sector will complement our existing work.’

WWF will also urge members of the public to lobby their MP. Head of campaigns Colin Butfield said: ‘The UK is the first country to introduce a Climate Change Bill, so this is a unique opportunity to set an example to the rest of the world.

‘It is vital that we get the best possible Bill through Parliament and we need MPs to hear a ground swell of public support to achieve this.’

The Climate Change Bill will undergo its second reading in the House of Commons later this month and is set to become law in summer 2008.

At the Aviation Environment Federation, Lockley was responsible for UK and EU policy relating to all the environmental impacts of aviation. The role involved lobbying, campaigning and media activities in addition to policy work.

Leston was climate change campaigner at the Women’s Environmental Network, responsible for developing its climate change work through policy, campaigning and fundraising.

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