Carbon Trust hires FH for renewable energy drive

The Carbon Trust (TCT) has appointed Fishburn Hedges to run a campaign promoting renewable energies and energy efficiency to major UK companies.

The £200,000 contract covers general PR, press office support, and a corporate communications brief and will run until March 2005.

The activity kicks off next month with a publicity campaign entitled ‘When he’s a dad’, which draws on The Carbon Trust’s previous work with companies to demonstrate how energy efficiency and cutting carbon emissions can benefit business.

FH director Gordon Tempest-Hay, said: ‘The message is that being more energy efficient and adopting renewable energies is better for profitability.

‘Our campaign shows what other companies that have already taken up work with the Carbon Trust have achieved. It will use a mix of advertising and PR.’

FH scooped the business after TCT received expressions of interest from 45 agencies. The contract was previously split between Hogarth and Communique.

Set up by government and supported by businesses, the Carbon Trust currently works with more than 150 public and private organisations, giving tailored advice to specific needs.

The independent organisation is part of the Government’s climate change programme and promotes new energy technologies such as wave power, fuel cells technology and biomass, the burning of crops.

Tempest-Hay said: ‘This is a new market in the UK but these are the people who are making the market, producing new technologies.’

The trust’s objectives are to help UK business and the public sector meet government targets for carbon dioxide emissions, which were set out in the 2003 energy white paper. The aim is to reduce carbon emissions by 60 per cent and create a low carbon economy by 2050.

TCT this week launched a city PR campaign by Citigate Dewe Rogerson highlighting the impact of the EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme.

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