Note to PR pros: Podcasters are busy. Plus other tips for pitching them

Muck Rack’s State of Podcasting report also explores what irks podcasters about pitches.

Nearly half of podcasters look at downloads to gauge their reach. (Photo credit: Getty Images).

NEW YORK: Muck Rack's annual State of Podcasting report is here, shining a light on just how many hats podcasters have to wear to get each episode out.

Based on a survey of close to 600 professional podcasters, the report explores their preferences and challenges, as well as highlights trends in the industry.

Many podcasters are responsible not just for hosting the podcast (43%), but they also often carry other roles, including promotion and marketing (45%) and booking guests (39%). More than half (53%) work on two or more podcasts at once.

Their responsibilities don't end there: 81% of those surveyed must source their own content. For others, content ideas come from current events (45%), while many fewer originate from pitches (22%). When booking guests, podcasters tend to prioritize organic guests (61%) over paid guests (39%), according to the report.

Even though many podcasters steer away from pitches for both content and guests, there are things PR pros can do to increase uptake. Many of those surveyed said a lack of personalization (51%) is a reason they reject pitches, while others cited a confusing subject line (33%) and bad timing (30%). Podcasters overwhelmingly prefer short, personalized emails sent early in the week.

To measure the success of their shows, most podcasters look at downloads (46%), followed by listens or streams (37%) and consumption rate (34%). Many podcasters use social media to increase their reach (70%), while others rely on a blog or website (54%) or email marketing (34%).

Muck Rack surveyed 591 professional podcasters from September 15 to October 5 across a range of industries and countries for the report.


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