Earth Day: here's what O2, Nike, Budweiser and more got up to

Levi's, Subway, SodaStream, Channel 4 and more.

Earth Day: O2, Nike, Budweiser and Sodastream
Earth Day: O2, Nike, Budweiser and Sodastream

With 2020 being tied for the warmest year on record, Earth Day (22 April) has never been more important.

We've come a long way since the days when this oil company saw fit to boast in an ad about melting the equivalent of seven million tons of glacier a day:

Here, Campaign rounds up some of the more (and less) impactful brand and media activity this Earth Day.

Water green idea

Mobile network O2 has teamed up with Spotify and The Times to launch its greenest ever campaign this Earth Day.

“O2 vs. CO2” is the next step in the company’s promise to become the first carbon net zero operator in the UK by 2025 - in attempts to “remove the C from CO2”.

The campaign includes special billboards with environmentally friendly paint that uses natural UV light to convert pollutants into water vapour and harmless nitrates. O2 has set out to highlight how carbon emissions affect our planet and will run educational ads in The Times’ new supplement, Times Earth.

It was created by Adam Arber and Austin Richards at VCCP.

Sneakers that go the extra mile

Nike is selling old trainers - but it’s better than it sounds.

The clothing giant has launched “Refurbished”, a scheme that encourages customers to send their old trainers back to the company to repair, and clean up, within 60 days.

The platform boosts the need for shoppers to repair and rewear in attempts to minimise waste - it’s a step in the right direction for the brand, which has vowed to create zero carbon emissions, and waste.

Buy once, wear always

After the launch of Levi’s sustainability-forward campaign “Buy better, wear longer” this month, the jeans brand has gone one step further this Earth Day.

“Buy better, wear longer” encourages customers to wear second-hand jeans, or get their goods repaired in store - but now Levi’s has partnered with ad platform Good-Loop to take it further.

Good-Loop exchanges charitable donations for media spend, and has donated £1.9m to global causes since 2016.

Good vibrations

Sandwich-shop Subway has partnered with vegan grime artists to make beats using vibrations from plants.

The “Plant-based Beats” campaign celebrates Earth Day and veganism - appealing to a Gen-Z audience, and encouraging them to live a greener, cruelty-free lifestyle.

Don’t bottle it up

SodaStream has joined forces with Randi Zuckerberg to launch its Earth Day campaign - asking social media users to help fight in the battle against climate change.

With the tag “Don’t just share, care”, the ad encourages people to transform fruitless social media concerns into real-life actions.

SodaStream has since committed to saving the use of 78 billion single-use plastic bottles by 2025.

Cheers to Planet Earth

Budweiser's new campaign “Together we can turn this around” begins as a doom-and-gloom poem about the climate crisis - but is full of hope and positivity when read in reverse.

It’s part of the brand's goal that all of its beer will be brewed with 100% renewable energy by 2025.

Something is clearly working, as the goal has been achieved in the United States, Canada, Argentina, Chile, France, Russia, South Africa and the U.K.

Maybe this just sucks

Creative directors at Activista LA have taken it upon themselves to speak for the whole of Planet Earth as they commissioned a billboard simply stating "Mars Sucks" this Earth Day.

The undoubtedly costly billboard was erected outside of the California HQ of Elon Musk's SpaceX, asking the organisation to stop thinking about going to Mars - and focus on the planet we have already colonised: Earth.

Funny for Musk haters perhaps, but the simple trolling attempt is exactly that: simple, providing nothing constructive, such as educational tools about the climate crisis or sustainability, while also using large quantities of materials.

Not-so Greta move

@channel4

Deepfake Greta Thunberg is here to teach you the #ManLikeGreta. But it's not her, it's actually impressionist @katiakvinge , using deepfake technology.

♬ Man Like Greta - Channel 4

TikTok would be a good place to start if you wanted to attract young people’s attention to the climate crisis - but this video, created for Channel 4 by Rockerdale Studios, has got it all wrong.

It features a newly-created TikTok dance called “the macarena for the apocalypse”, performed by a deepfake Greta Thunberg, without actually inviting young people to take action.

Klarna's carbon footprint insights

Payment platform Klarna has partnered with Doconomy to provide a free in-app service, providing customers with a carbon value for each purchase.

Every purchase made through Klarna includes a carbon footprint, potentially encouraging consumers to limit their impact.

This article first appeared on PRWeek sister title Campaign

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