Breakfast Briefing: 5 things for PR pros to know on Wednesday morning

VP debate; Trump reverses course on stimulus; Y&R PR rebrands; Facebook bans QAnon.

What to watch tonight: After both sides reached a last-minute agreement about on-stage COVID-19 precautions, Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) are set to face off in what’s shaping up to be a debate dominated by the coronavirus pandemic. The big question: How harshly will Harris criticize President Donald Trump’s handling of the crisis just days after his positive test? Here’s what to keep an eye on tonight via The Hill, CNBC, NPR and USA Today and a refresher on moderator Susan Page. Plus: New questions about whether the second presidential debate will take place as planned.

Global markets are making sense of Trump’s abrupt reversal last night on a second coronavirus stimulus after walking away from the table hours earlier. Amid a lengthy tweet-storm, Trump called on legislators to send him a package including $1,200 stimulus checks and relief for airlines and other industries, hours after demanding negotiations with Democrats be shelved until after the election. 

It’s Y&R PR no more. The WPP agency has rebranded as Goodfuse, a name that defines its mission of “infusing humanity into communications.” The BCW Group firm launched in 2013 to serve Pfizer, a client of creative shop Young & Rubicam, which was merged with VML two years ago. 

Facebook is taking a harder line on QAnon, banning the mass delusion across its platforms by removing Pages, Groups and Instagram accounts representing the conspiracy theory and labeling it as a “militarized social movement.” Facebook also acknowledged that previous policies, which only banned violent QAnon content, didn’t go far enough. More, via recode: Can anyone stop QAnon?

Now for some good breakfast table news: McDonald’s is planning to add more baked goods to its breakfast menu this month, such as apple fritters, blueberry muffins and cinnamon rolls. The fast-food chain’s breakfast sales have struggled as consumers’ habits changed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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