Who's in and who's out in the Number 10 comms team following the election?

As the dust settles on the aftermath of a seismic general election result, we look at the figures tipped to be staying on at Number 10 to form its new comms team in 2020.

L-R: Robert Oxley, Dominic Cummings and Lee Cain are all believed to be staying on at Number 10 (pic credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire/PA Images; Adrian Dennis - WPA Pool/Getty Images) )
L-R: Robert Oxley, Dominic Cummings and Lee Cain are all believed to be staying on at Number 10 (pic credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire/PA Images; Adrian Dennis - WPA Pool/Getty Images) )

PRWeek understands that the team at Number 10 is heavily angled towards the Leave camp, with few Remainers in an advisory role, and that the future comms action will be concentrated in Downing Street rather than CCHQ because the Government, with its thumping majority, no longer needs the approval of the wider Conservative Party.

Dominic Cummings, Boris Johnson's director of strategy – who, along with Lynton Crosby acolyte Isaac Levido, delivered the stunning election victory – is thought to be being lined up for a beefed-up role.

However, the notion of Cummings becoming a possible chief of staff at Number 10 is alarming to some Conservatives.

Levido is not thought to be staying on, having been brought in to run the campaign.

Lee Cain, who has only been in post since July but is enjoying the approval of colleagues following the election, will stay on as Johnson's director of comms.

So will Number 10's chief spokesman and head of news, Rob Oxley, who was caught on camera swearing at a GMTV journalist on live TV in the dying days of the campaign. Oxley's deputy, Jamie Davies, was appointed in October.

Ben Gascoigne, a former adviser to Johnson when he was Foreign Secretary, has just been appointed as political secretary to the Prime Minister following the election victory.

However, New Zealand digital duo Sean Topham and Ben Guerin, who delivered an impactful social-media campaign for the Conservatives, are understood to be too expensive to remain in Number 10 following the election.

Hanbury Strategy provided opinion polling data and modelling to help the party assess the electoral battleground and where to prioritise resources, while the agency's co-founder Paul Stephenson, who is also the former comms director for Vote Leave, volunteered to help Cain during the election. However, he is not thought to be staying on.


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