PR agency teams up with London universities to 'kick-start' graduate careers

London-based PR agency, Mc&T, will launch its 'Makers in Residence' programme this summer with a three-month residency for creative graduates at their Shoreditch offices.

The agency will offer graduates from the University of Westminster, Kingston University and Ravensbourne University London, a package that includes a small bursary of expenses.

Supported by Soho Works, the programme will encourage graduates to develop their freelance work while giving them proximity to major consumer brands from Mc&T’s portfolio of clients.

The opportunity is open to all forms of ‘makers’ - from graphic designers to creative writers, technologists and UX designers - and will include a mentoring programme that incorporates PR, marketing, design and brand strategy development.

Iona Inglesby, creative at Mc&T, is leading the programme. She said: "I freelanced for years and set up a business prior to joining Mc&T which was a pretty lonely experience a lot of the time."

"I would have loved the opportunity to bed in with an agency, to have that network around me while maintaining my independence," she added. "I’m really pleased we can offer this to the next generation of creatives who have that entrepreneurial spirit."

Director at Mc&T, Paul McEntee, said the agency was launching the initiative because ‘makers’ are vital to the UK creative economy.

Sheila Birungi is the manager of the Creative Enterprise Centre (CEC) and student entrepreneurship programme manager at the University of Westminster. She said the CEC was "proud to collaborate" with the initiative as it is the centre’s mission to enable their graduates to build and sustain successful and rewarding professional freelancing and entrepreneurial careers.

"Kingston University is delighted to partner with Mc&T to help our creative graduates gain valuable workplace experience," added Katharine Edwards, careers and employability advisor at Kingston University London.

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