'Leaked' Brexit deal comms grid 'does not represent' Government thinking

The Government has distanced itself from a document leaked to media outlets including the BBC last night, purporting to show how it might sell a Brexit deal to the public and Parliament.

Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab would be expected to sell the deal, according to the 'leaked' document (pic credit:Dinendra Haria/Shutterstock)
Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab would be expected to sell the deal, according to the 'leaked' document (pic credit:Dinendra Haria/Shutterstock)
The document gives a timetable from this week and begins with the Prime Minister presenting a final deal to the Cabinet yesterday (6 November), after which it was expected that the details of the deal would be leaked to the media.

Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab would hail the deal as "a moment of decisive progress", but with a muted sense of victory.

According to the document: "The narrative is going to be measured success, that this is good for everyone, but won't be all Champagne corks popping."

Following the Parliamentary recess and ten days of 'Sherpa meetings' with the EU27, there would be a series of themed announcements, daily.

This would start with Theresa May announcing to the CBI conference that the Government had delivered on the EU referendum.

As part of the Government’s efforts to sell the deal to the business community, the document states that May would say, "this deal brings the country back together, now is the time for us all to unite behind it for the good of all our futures" etc.

Meanwhile, Raab would make a statement to Parliament on the Withdrawal Agreement and the Future Framework and would also "do media", while junior ministers were despatched to fill the airways on regional media all day.

The document outlines its hopes for supportive voices to endorse the deal, at home, abroad and on social media.

It states: "Government lining up 25 top business voices including Carolyn Fairbairn and lots of world leaders e.g. Japanese PM to tweet support for the deal."

The next day, according to the document, the Cabinet Office would publish an "explainer of the deal and what it means for the public, comparing it to No Deal, but not to our current deal".

Regional support

The Government would also seek to receive the backing of "supportive voices in devolved regions" such as elected mayors Andy Street in the West Midlands and Labour’s Andy Burnham in Manchester, as well as "third sector voices".

Themed announcements in the following days would include the economy and jobs, led by the Chancellor, and immigration, led by the Home Secretary, who would "do media and visits" while Raab appeared on BBC Question Time in the West Midlands.

The misspelling and childish language in this document should be enough to make clear it doesn't represent the Government's thinking.

Government spokesperson
At this stage, the Government would hope to have won the support of the powerful trade association, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, the document says, "along with influential voices from the rest of the world saying how great this is for the flow of global talent".

Business voices

According to the document, themed days would cover money and Northern Ireland and the Union, in which the Government would try to win the support of Leo Varadkar, the Irish Taoiseach.

There would also be announcements on global Britain and "taking back control of our laws" while "lining up lots of former foreign secs to come out in support". 

Government woos MPs

May would be interviewed by the BBC’s David Dimbleby while, on the day Parliament votes on the deal, the Government’s message to MPs would be that this is a "historic moment, put your own interests aside, put the country’s interests first and back this deal".

However, the Government dismissed the authenticity of the document in a statement to the media last night.

A government spokesperson said: "The misspelling and childish language in this document should be enough to make clear it doesn't represent the Government's thinking. You would expect the Government to have plans for all situations — to be clear, this isn't one of them."


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