Former Reagan press secretary, gun-control champion Brady dies at 73

Brady suffered a gunshot wound to the head in the assassination attempt on Reagan in 1981. The brain damage caused paralysis and remanded him to a wheelchair, according to Reuters, but did not stop Brady from championing the "Brady bill," a law passed in 1993 that mandated a waiting period and background checks for prospective gun owners.

Brady, at right, with his wife, Sarah.
Brady, at right, with his wife, Sarah.

WASHINGTON: James Brady, the former press secretary for President Ronald Reagan and gun-control advocate for whom the White House press briefing room was renamed in 2000, died on Monday at the age of 73, according to numerous reports.

Brady suffered a gunshot wound to the head in the assassination attempt on Reagan in 1981. The resulting brain damage caused paralysis and remanded him to a wheelchair. Yet it did not stop him from championing the "Brady bill," the law passed in 1993 that mandated a waiting period and background checks for prospective gun owners.

Brady’s tenure as press secretary lasted through the end of the Reagan administration in 1989. Though he did not perform the day-to-day duties of the role after the assassination attempt on Reagan, successors Larry Speakes and Marlin Fitzwater held the position on an interim basis.

Brady previously served as a staffer for various Republican elected officials.

Details of his death were not immediately available, according to The Washington Post.

"We are heartbroken to share the news that our beloved Jim 'Bear' Brady has passed away after a series of health issues," Brady’s family said in a statement to ABC News. "Jim Brady's zest for life was apparent to all who knew him, and despite his injuries and the pain he endured every day, he used his humor, wit, and charm to bring smiles to others and make the world a better place."

Fellow former White House press secretaries and communications staffers shared their condolences on Twitter on Monday.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in