Boy Scouts admits it failed to protect children from abuse

After an Oregon court released once-private files describing sex abuse allegations within the Boy Scouts of America, the organization apologized for failing to protect children from abusers.

After an Oregon court released once-private files describing sex abuse allegations within the Boy Scouts of America, the organization apologized for failing to protect children from abusers.

“There have been instances where people misused their positions in scouting to abuse children, and in certain cases, our response to these incidents and our efforts to protect youth were plainly insufficient, inappropriate, or wrong. Where those involved in scouting failed to protect, or worse, inflicted harm on children, we extend our deepest and sincere apologies to victims and their families,” said Wayne Perry, national president of Boy Scouts of America, in a statement.

Oregon's highest court ordered the 14,500 pages of records, known among Boy Scout officials as “the perversion files,” to be made public under the state's open records law as part of a landmark 2010 case against the organization.

Last month, the Los Angeles Times published a series of articles saying that the Boy Scouts kept hundreds of child-abuse allegations under wraps, often failing to report them to the police. Many of the alleged abusers were reportedly expelled and later reentered the organization, only to be accused of molestation again.

Like it did in August, the organization is emphasizing its youth safety procedures, saying its “system of ineligible volunteer files helps protect scouts.” The Boy Scouts began compiling the blacklist of alleged abusers soon after its founding in 1910.

The Boy Scouts have worked with Fleishman-Hillard since 2008.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in