Glaser Foundation taps Red Deluxe to relaunch comms

WASHINGTON: The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation has hired integrated agency Red Deluxe to help it rebrand and recalibrate its communications strategy.

WASHINGTON: The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation has hired integrated agency Red Deluxe to help it rebrand and recalibrate its communications strategy.

The organization wants to emphasize its contention that it is the leading organization fighting pediatric HIV and AIDS. It also plans to highlight a broader message about maternal and child health and diversify its supporter and fundraising base, according to the RFP for the contract.

“We're celebrating our 25th anniversary, and when we started, it was around one issue domestically,” said Jill Davis, director of brand management and interactive communications at the foundation. “Since then, our work around the globe has expanded greatly, but that isn't reflected in our brand narrative.”

The foundation launched in 1988 with the mission of preventing pediatric HIV infection and ending pediatric AIDS through research, advocacy, prevention, and treatment programs. Its namesake founder contracted HIV in a blood transfusion in 1981 while giving birth to her daughter. Both the mother and child eventually died from AIDS complications.

The nonprofit chose Memphis-based Red Deluxe after a competitive RFP process because of the methodology it uses for branding efforts, as well as it being the best cultural fit of all the applicants, Davis explained.

The scope of work includes performing an audit of the foundation's communications and messaging as well as testing messages and identifying a potential spokesperson.

Davis declined to release a budget for the contract, but said the organization's new theme will likely premiere late this year or in early 2014.

Red Deluxe has done similar rebranding work for nonprofits the American Lung Association and Youth Villages, a group serving children in the nation's welfare system, said Stinson Liles, principal and co-founder at the firm.

The account will give the agency a chance to “provide real clarity” to work the organization is doing, he said.

“Once you have a clear promise that you can share and you align all your commutations around that, your messages can travel so much further,” Liles explained.

The foundation's funding comes from a mix of cooperative agreements with the federal government and contributions and grants from other government and multilateral organizations, individuals, corporations, and foundations. Its 2012 revenue was $122 million, down from more than $162 million in 2011 and $151 million in 2010, according to financial statements.

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