BlackBerry explores sale as it looks for turnaround

WATERLOO, ONTARIO: BlackBerry has put itself up for sale as part of a strategic review as it tries to find a way of turning around its struggling business in the fierce smartphone sector.

WATERLOO, ONTARIO: BlackBerry has put itself up for sale as part of a strategic review as it tries to find a way of turning around its struggling business in the fierce smartphone sector.

The Canadian firm is also considering a joint venture, strategic partnerships or alliances, "or other possible transactions" as BlackBerry continues to lose its grip on a smartphone market it once dominated.

Last week, International Data Corporation (IDC) reported Windows Phone shipments had surpassed those of BlackBerry in the first two quarters of the year, meaning BlackBerry has now slipped to fourth place in the global operating system rankings.

Companies including Amazon and Microsoft have been rumored to be interested in buying the BlackBerry business, while IBM is reportedly interested in buying parts of the company.

Meanwhile, Dell is said to have considered a strategic alliance for BlackBerry's enterprise software.

Chinese brands Huawei and ZTE, which have both been linked to surveillance activities, are being dismissed as potential buyers because of BlackBerry's popularity among US government departments.

In April, BlackBerry consolidated most of its global PR work with a team from APCO Worldwide and Text 100. The account has been estimated to be worth $10 million.

BlackBerry's position in the market was damaged by the much-delayed launch of its BlackBerry 10 operating system, which it eventually debuted at the beginning of this year with its biggest-ever marketing campaign as it sought to regain ground on rivals.

At the same time, the company also renamed itself from Research in Motion to BlackBerry in a further attempt to turn around its fortunes.

BlackBerry has set up a special committee to lead the potential sale of the company. It consists of chief executive Thorsten Heins, Barbara Stymiest, Richard Lynch, and Bert Nordberg, with Timothy Dattels as chairman.  

JP Morgan Securities will serve as financial advisor to BlackBerry.

This story originally appeared on the website of Marketing.

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