Women wonder: 'why should I care about Obamacare?'

What's the first question many of us ask when faced with something new? "How will this affect me?" For many women, that is still an open question when it comes to the Affordable Care Act.

The following blog post is the second of a three-part series based on the results of the SheSpeaks/Lippe Taylor Affordable Care Act: Impact on Women Survey that polled more than 1,000 women about their understanding and opinions about “Obamacare” and the government shutdown.

What's the first question many of us ask when faced with something new? “How will this affect me?”  For many women, that is still an open question when it comes to the Affordable Care Act. 

Many of the benefits offered under the healthcare law seem to be aimed at helping women and families. And yet, one of the key target audiences, women, seem to understand very little about these benefits. 

Any top executive at a company would demand clear, concise information prior to making a major decision that will affect their organization. So, it's no wonder that as the “chief healthcare officers” of their homes, women are in search of as much information as possible to make decisions about the Affordable Care Act.

According to research Lippe Taylor and SheSpeaks conducted earlier this year, 56% of women say they are the primary purchaser of healthcare for their husbands and boyfriends. So, women don't just make healthcare decisions for themselves and their children, they make them for the men in their lives as well.

We were curious about what's causing the most confusion in regards to the law, so we decided to dig deeper. Lippe Taylor teamed up with the insights and influencer platform, SheSpeaks, to explore women's beliefs about Obamacare with the SheSpeaks/Lippe Taylor Affordable Care Act: Impact on Women Survey. While 65% of women think Obamacare will affect their personal healthcare in the next 12 months, only 28% of those think the impact will be positive. We learned that among women's chief concerns were whether they would be able to continue to see their current physician (31%), if their healthcare costs and taxes will increase (58% and 47%, respectively, believe they will), and whether they will have to pay more for a pre-existing condition (28% think they will).

It's never been more important for healthcare marketers to help educate women and resolve the uncertainty. This represents a huge opportunity for healthcare stakeholders to gain trust by better informing women. As smart marketers already know, clearly communicating the benefits and impact of a product or service will have on one's life is critical to getting consumers to buy-in to their proposition. If you clearly explain how having health coverage will impact her family, her finances and her peace of mind, then she will be able to make an informed decision about whether or not try something new for her household.

Elise Titan is EVP leading the health and wellness practice at Lippe Taylor.

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