Bite: Mobile, social not only ways to reach Millennials

Despite the belief that Millennials spend most of their lives on mobile devices or social media, the generation is not as digitally dependent as many people think, according to a study from Bite.

NEW YORK: Despite the belief that Millennials spend most of their lives on mobile devices or social media, the generation is not as digitally dependent as many people think, according to a study from Bite.

The Millennial Index survey, conducted by Bite and Redshift Research, revealed that only 15% of Millennials are on Twitter for more than three hours a week, and 43% do not use Twitter at all.

Out of the 2,000 US and UK consumers between the ages of 17 and 31 that were surveyed, fewer than half (41%) said they go on Facebook for more than three hours a week.

Jane Hales, client services director at Redshift Research, said the data shows that while digital campaigns are important, some brands forget that “the more traditional channels still have a big place.”

She added that if a brand launches an initiative heavily weighted toward one channel, such as Twitter, it could miss a big chunk of its market.

The study also showed that 65% of Millennials spend more time accessing the Internet on a laptop or desktop rather than a mobile device or tablet. In this study, Millennials were categorized as people born between 1981 and 2004.

One takeaway from the report is that brands should employ a “multiscreen” approach to target Millennials, said Hales. When it comes to their social lives, Millennials likely want to be engaged via a mobile device, she added, but they are still getting information from other screens during the day.

Participants said they spend about 108 hours a year browsing the Internet for work or to study, almost as much time as they spend texting. The group spends 77 hours per year reading news online, six hours more than the time they are on Twitter.

When it comes to celebrity gossip, Millennials said they attribute about 36 hours per year on it. Also, only 3% of Millennials aspire to be celebrities, but 20% strive to be entrepreneurs, which the study linked to the high number of young but successful founders of companies such as Facebook, Craigslist, and Google.

Hales said that part of the research indicates that the “values, motivations, and emotional pulls and triggers of young people are not hugely dissimilar to the generations before them.”

She added that Millennials are interested in authenticity and can “see rubbish quite quickly,” which means that if a company uses a celebrity ambassador for a campaign, the person should make sense for a brand and fit its values.

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