Let’s not forget about nutrition

Nutrition has been on the fringe of health and wellness for years. And, while nutritionists are still considered alternative medicine practitioners, most of us agree...

Nutrition has been on the fringe of health and wellness for years. And, while nutritionists are still considered alternative medicine practitioners, most of us agree that well-balanced diets are important for disease management and prevention. However, given the profound changes that will occur within the healthcare system in the next few years, nutrition will surely take a more significant role as it relates to disease management, prevention, and health outcomes. The question PR professionals will need to consider is, “How will communications strategies support symptom and disease-oriented product marketing along with nutrition messages?”

For starters, we need to educate our youth differently and provide them with information about nutrition and food options to inform their behavior. For example, while we know and appreciate the value of statins for controlling cholesterol levels it is also important to stress in our communications the link between foods that are high in cholesterol and their related health impact. These messages are just as important as those delivered to support for medical products.

In an earlier blog this week, I talked about the need for the healthcare industry to restore trust. One way to do this would be to aggressively promote nutrition as a central tenant of health and wellness. Don’t get me wrong, there are admirable efforts underway that stress the importance of a healthy diet for managing chronic disease. However, imagine how impactful it would be for the entire industry to come together, much like we saw in the early days of healthcare reform, in support of a national campaign on nutrition. I am sure, over time we would see a decrease in chronic diseases, decrease in weight and a decrease in heart disease.

The goal is not to reduce the usage of medications, there will always be a role for medications, but rather to increase awareness so that individuals can complement a treatment regiment with their own modified behavior and thereby achieve better health outcomes.

Chris Foster, chairman, US healthcare, Burson-Marsteller

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in