Why creativity matters more than ever

Arriving in Silicon Valley from the UK a decade ago, I was struck by the fact that creativity and innovation were driven out of engineering labs, not PR and marketing departments.

Arriving in Silicon Valley from the UK a decade ago, I was struck by the fact that creativity and innovation were driven out of engineering labs, not PR and marketing departments. PR in the dot.com boom typically meant doing smart media relations to get the story out as far and wide as possible. Genuinely creative PR campaigns were a rare breed.

Today, with Web 2.0, the explosion of social media and the depleted ranks of traditional media, cutting through the chaos to generate stand-out results for clients means creativity matters more than ever. Yet how can you achieve this with diminished budgets and fewer resources?

Our approach is to create a mash-up of:

- What the public wants to hear about

- What journalists want to write about

- What clients want to say

This sounds obvious, but all too often we meet with potential clients who are disappointed with their PR results. When we dig a little deeper to find out why, nine times out of 10 it's because their PR programs were built solely around the company's messages, without considering the world at large.

Tourism Queensland's Best Job in the World” campaign is a great example of this approach in action. With vacation spending at an all-time low due to the global recession, what better way to get Queensland into the media and capture the public's imagination, than by linking the destination to job creation? Red's "Dangerous Celebrities" campaign for McAfee achieved similar results, grabbing more broadcast minutes than ever before by linking starlet Jessica Biel to cyber threats.

This approach leads to client satisfaction and is a great way to engage and retain Gen-Y'ers.

Alice Chan, SVP and GM, Red Consultancy

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