Study: Reporters turn to social media for research

NEW YORK: An "overwhelming" majority of journalists rely on social media sources for story research, according to a recent Cision survey.

NEW YORK: An "overwhelming" majority of journalists rely on social media sources for story research, according to a recent Cision survey. Polling 9,100 editors and journalists nationally, the survey discovered 89% use blogs, 65% use social media like Facebook and LinkedIn, and 52% use microblogging sites like Twitter for research and source information when writing an article. Additionally, 61% turn to Wikipedia.

The survey, conducted with George Washington University's master's degree program in strategic PR, also found that journalists still turn to PR pros for “interviews and access to sources and experts (44%), answers to questions and targeted information (23%), and perspective, information in context, and background information (17%)."

Meanwhile, results of a recent Vocus study on the state of the media show 293 newspapers folded last year, with nearly 100 of those closing in the first quarter alone. Including print and online, 1,126 magazines closed, with eight of those bringing in a circulation of 1 million before getting the axe. In the radio industry, 10,000 jobs were lost, and the survey called bankruptcies in the TV sector "common," with more than 100 stations affected by parent companies filing for Chapter 11.

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