PR concerns could slow corporate spending in elections

News outlets are already beginning to look at how the Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling to allow corporations to spend an unlimited amount of money in support of political candidates will affect the organizations at the center of the national policy debates.

News outlets are already beginning to look at how the Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling to allow corporations to spend an unlimited amount of money in support of political candidates will affect the organizations at the center of the national policy debates.

The AP noted that the ruling was a victory for US Chamber of Commerce, the AFL-CIO, and the National Rifle Association -- groups funded by large corporations that may not want to put a company name on an ad but would put funding into their industry trade group.

President Barack Obama said it is “a major victory for big oil, Wall Street banks, health insurance companies and the other powerful interests that marshal their power every day in Washington to drown out the voices of everyday Americans.”

For industries like healthcare, pharmaceutical companies now have the ability to use ads to ask voters to support or oppose a specific candidate instead of funding issue campaigns which break down where a candidate may stand on an issue.

Chris DeLacy, a partner at Holland & Knight, told The National Journal that shareholder and PR concerns could reduce how much corporate spending would go into these type of ads because companies have to decide whether they want to disclose spending to the public.

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