P&G opens up on comms steps during Pampers crisis

What's unusual about P&G's crisis effort, which, in this case, seems premeditated and flawless based on a detailed account in Ad Age, is the company's transparency on its crisis communications strategy.

P&G is disputing claims that its Pampers' Dry Max product causes skin irritation. On Friday, when reported by angry moms online, the standard wildfire ensued, with news spreading from social media to national media.

What's unusual about P&G's crisis effort, which, in this case, seems premeditated and flawless based on a detailed account in Ad Age, is the company's transparency on its crisis communications strategy.

Most companies don't invite marketing reporters into their crisis quarters, but they may now. Ad Age's “behind-the-scenes glimpse” generated a positive story for Pampers' relationship with its consumers.      

“Many critics who think P&G isn't listening to the consumer complaints might be surprised to see how intently it is,” reported Ad Age, which then outlined how the company is responding to consumer complaints online. 

The story continued, “If there's any cover-up or much subterfuge in P&G's strategy, it was hard to spot in the three-and-a-half hours Ad Age observed the team directly on May 7, or from other accounts of P&G's response.”

Calls to P&G were not immediately returned to PRWeek, leaving me with a question about the role that this communications approach played in Pampers' overarching crisis strategy and whether or not this approach produces an effective response or one that's too obviously contrived.

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