CDC addresses national HIV/AIDS strategy

ATLANTA: The CDC's HIV/AIDS prevention division is looking at ways to coordinate its longstanding social marketing programs with the Obama Administration's national HIV/AIDS strategy.

ATLANTA: The CDC's HIV/AIDS prevention division is looking at ways to coordinate its longstanding social marketing programs with the Obama Administration's national HIV/AIDS strategy.

President Obama released the national HIV/AIDS strategy for the US in July. One component of the strategy calls for federal agencies to evaluate domestic HIV/AIDS programs. Agencies involved include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the National Institutes of Health.

Elizabeth-Ann Chandler, director of news media relations at the CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, said the agency is focusing on finding synergies within various CDC programs.

“We want to make sure the left hand knows what the right is doing, and can further the goals of the strategy,” she added.

The CDC launched an initiative in June aimed at helping physicians make HIV testing part of standard care. The agency released recommendations in 2006 recommending that all Americans aged 13 to 64 get tested for HIV in their routine care.

The initiative is part of the CDC's larger “Act Against AIDS” campaign, which launched in 2009.

“We're the main agency that does those types of campaigns,” said Chandler. “But, in terms of coordination, there are several agencies named in the strategy that will be at the table and that's what the White House really wants."

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