Apple and the art of product announcements

Apple product announcements are becoming predictable, but from a communications standpoint that is partly what makes them a masterful display of communications.

Apple product announcements are becoming predictable, but from a communications standpoint that is partly what makes them a masterful display of communications.

On Wednesday Apple CEO Steve Jobs, dressed in his humdrum black shirt and jeans, unveiled updates to the iPod, Apple TV box, and announced a social media-like feature to iTunes called Ping.

The message was controlled and clean. Apple live-streamed the event, but in order for it to be watched a viewer had to have Mac software. The whole San Francisco event was a PR clinic of simplicity and effectiveness.

But it's safe, and appeals mostly to the already established cult of Apple fanatics. Sure, the press will cover the event and it will land on the nightly news and on front pages across the nation. But from a communications standpoint these Apple announcements don't resonate beyond Apple's base of customers, they simply reinforce the existing ones.

Politicians know appealing to their base is wise, and so does Apple. I am not sold, but obviously many people are. And that's what's most important.

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