Content within espouses the added value print can provide

To engage today's time-poor, Internet-obsessed consumer, print products need to add significant value if they are to persuade readers to tear off the plastic wrapper and open the magazine.

To engage today's time-poor, Internet-obsessed consumer, print products need to add significant value if they are to persuade readers to tear off the plastic wrapper and open the magazine. Print publications must really drill down into issues and provide informed analysis, comment, and opinion, all in a user-friendly and attractive manner.

This month's edition of PRWeek contains the aforementioned value in spades. As the curtain rises on another hockey season, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman outlines the challenges and opportunities of marketing a sport across a vast array of media channels, from radio through to Twitter. Dialogue with fans is at the top of his agenda - and that's right in PR's sweet spot.

In Burson-Marsteller worldwide CEO Mark Penn's Op-Ed, the Washington polling guru takes stock of crisis communications in light of this year's high-profile debacles at BP and Toyota. This theme continues in our corporate analysis, where the use of social media in crises such as this summer's egg recall and the Discovery gunman standoff is put under the spotlight.

This month's Newsmaker is Kekst and Company's new president and CEO Lawrence Rand. The profile tracks the transition of leadership from agency founder Gershon Kekst to Rand and the adoption of a cooperative structure that formalized working practices that have been in place informally for years. And, in an exclusive PRWeek/Barkley PR study, our cover feature reveals men's attitudes toward cause marketing, the first such survey conducted for some years.

Add our public affairs roundtable into the mix and, I'm sure you'll agree, that's a lot of value.

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