Government agencies plan busy National Women's Health Week

Ogilvy Worldwide and Edelman are working with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and American Heart Association (AHA), respectively, for events coinciding with National Women's Health Week (NWHW), which begins Sunday.

Ogilvy Worldwide and Edelman are working with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and American Heart Association (AHA), respectively, for events coinciding with National Women's Health Week (NWHW), which begins Sunday.

NWHW, timed with Mother’s Day, is being organized by the Office of Women’s Health, a division of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

The Heart Truth Road Show, part of The Heart Truth campaign by Ogilvy for the NHLBI, makes its third and final stop in Washington DC’s Union Station on Mother’s Day weekend, after visiting Pittsburgh and Memphis. The campaign is offering free heart disease risk-factor screenings for diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol, and body mass index.

The Heart Truth, in conjunction with Ogilvy, launched the red dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease in February 2003.

Terry Long, director of communications for NHLBI, said that, according to a national survey done last year, brand awareness of the red dress symbol for heart disease was at 25%.  “This year, Lifetime television did a similar survey and found that it had gone up to 39%. It’s amazing when you think that three and half years ago this brand didn’t exist.”

The NHLBI decided to take on women’s heart disease in 2001 and began working with Ogilvy in Sept. 2002. The total cost of the account over the last 3 years has been $5 million.

Edelman is working with the AHA for the “Go Red for Women” campaign. The AHA is trying to enroll 500,000 women in the movement via it Go Red Web site and local events. Throughout NWHW, local branches of the AHA have worked to organize events like walks and luncheon to celebrate women’s health and raise awareness.

“Our message is simple: by joining Go Red, you become an important part of the fight against heart disease,” says Cheryl Overton, SVP/director RX consumer strategy and planning for Edelman.

Edelman has been working with the campaign for about a year and has taken on the task of reworking the brand to give it a new look and feel. It is contracted to work on the campaign until the end of 2006.

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