Being a real PR leader

Tom Martin's May 29 column ("Decision-making table requires an etiquette for effectiveness") clearly lays out the requirements for being a PR leader.

Tom Martin's May 29 column ("Decision-making table requires an etiquette for effectiveness") clearly lays out the requirements for being a PR leader.

Without so stating, he differentiates between what it takes to be part of the policy and decision-making process and the job of managing the communications function.

Managers aren't always good leaders. Leaders aren't always good managers. But one thing is clear: Being able to manage a function won't necessarily lift you up and out of the cafeteria.

Peter Osgood
Osgood O'Donnell & Walsh
New York


Good news for PR?
As I read "Annenberg study shows stability in PR industry," (PRWeek, May 22), I wasn't sure if I should laugh or cry.

The results were reported rather optimistically considering that PR got $646 per $1 million from Fortune 500 corporations and $962 per $1 million from Fortune 1001 to 2000 corporations in 2005. Furthermore, money spent on PR was 1.28% of the advertising budgets.

Is this supposed to be good news? For next year, perhaps Annenberg should skip the study - it's too depressing - and spend the money on a PR campaign for PR.

Susan Tellem
Tellem Worldwide
Los Angeles


Releases need real news

I applaud Swift Communications for introducing the press release 2.0 ("Evolution of press release could drive differentiation," PRWeek, May 29). The company has taken a long-used strategy - breaking up a news release into individual chunks - and applied it to fit today's tech-crazed PR pros.

There is one missing item, however. You still must have real news in a release. Dressing up non-news with truncated bits won't produce news value.

You can put a tutu and a tiara on a pig, and maybe even teach it to dance, but in the end, it's still a pig.

Wilma Mathews
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ


Corrections
A June 19 story reported that Robert Tappan, named president of Burson-Marsteller's DC office, will oversee Direct Impact, BKSH, and Schoen & Berland Associates. He will only oversee Direct Impact.

In addition, a June 19 People Moves entry noted that Steve Singerman joined Weber Shandwick from Edelman-Chicago. In fact, Singerman was an MD at Zeno Group in Chicago before joining WS. We regret the errors.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in