Ogilvy nets CDC contracts

WASHINGTON: Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide recently announced new contracts with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) covering AIDS education in the workplace, safer driving by teens, gynecologic cancer awareness, promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, and terrorism education and training resources for emergency healthcare providers.

WASHINGTON: Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide recently announced new contracts with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) covering AIDS education in the workplace, safer driving by teens, gynecologic cancer awareness, promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, and terrorism education and training resources for emergency healthcare providers.

Ogilvy PR managing director Rob Mathias declined to provide value for the contracts, which range in length from one to five years. Mathias said that apart from the "Business Responds to AIDS" program, on which Ogilvy had previously worked with CDC, the contracts represented new work. Each campaign will likely require different means of public outreach, he said. Some of the work will involve developing print and interactive materials or creating social marketing campaigns to help the CDC reach constituents.

"Each one will be different," Mathias said. "For example, the teen driving campaign draws on our expertise on how to target tweens and teens. Effecting behavior change in teenagers is a dramatically different proposition than effecting behavior change in a middle-aged adult."

In addition to the CDC wins, Ogilvy PR also announced a contract to support fundraising and general awareness of the new National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington, DC, expected to open in early 2010.

Herb Giobbi, CEO of the National Law Enforcement Memorial Fund, which is overseeing development of the museum, valued the contract the "hundreds of thousands of dollars" range and said Ogilvy bested three other unnamed firms invited to bid for the contract. Details of the forthcoming campaign to promote the museum have yet to be worked out.

"This will be the nationwide law enforcement museum," Giobbi said. "It's going to be [positioned as] a really cool place to go."

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