You say guacamole, we say partially hydrogenated soybean oil

I can't decide whether this is a frivolous lawsuit or a legitimate claim. Maybe you can help me.

A Los Angeles woman, Brenda Lifsey,...

I can't decide whether this is a frivolous lawsuit or a legitimate claim. Maybe you can help me.

A Los Angeles woman, Brenda Lifsey, is suing Kraft because its Kraft Dips Guacamole contains less than 2% avocado, which would normally be the bulk of a guacamole recipe. After making a three-layer dip last year that didn't taste "avocado-y", Lifsey read the list of ingredients, which show more oil than avocado. Her lawyer warns that other "fake guacamole" makers are on their hit list. The LA Times reports that Lifsey has a history of suing large corporations.

Sounds frivolous right? But, Kraft is changing the labels, supermarket shelves in California have been cleared of the offending dip, and there are FDA regulations that peanut butter has to contain at least 90% peanuts. Maybe the same should be true for other products?

A Kraft spokesperson says people understand that the dip isn't made of real avocados because the ingredients, which Lifsey eventually read, are printed on the label. True, but it still leaves a bad aftertaste. If something is written on a label in big type, do you have to read the small type to make sure you're not eating a Kraft chemistry experiment?

Google News has 34 articles on this subject; bad press that might be worth avoiding with better labeling.

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