Study shows importance of traditional media

NEW YORK: Traditional and local media still carry a great deal of influence with consumers, according to a survey by Ketchum and University of Southern California's Annenberg Strategic Public Relations Center.

NEW YORK: Traditional and local media still carry a great deal of influence with consumers, according to a survey by Ketchum and University of Southern California's Annenberg Strategic Public Relations Center.

According to the survey, nearly 74% of consumers get their information from local TV news, while approximately 69% read the local newspaper.

"The myth that this survey knocks out is that traditional media is dead," said David Rockland, partner and global director of research at Ketchum. "There is nothing in this survey that would suggest that traditional media would not continue to be a key part of the media mix."

The survey, titled "Media Myths & Realities" compares the media habits of 1,490 Americans with the practices of 500 corporate communications professionals. 

Another myth the survey dispels is that young adults do not read newspapers. It found that 52 % of 18-24 year olds and nearly 64% of 25-34 year olds read their local newspaper.

"Today's young media consumer still has lots of elements of …more traditional media as part of the mix," added Rockland. "[Blogs and other new media] may be new, but it isn't predominant."

Nicholas Scibetta, SVP and global director of Ketchum's Communications and Media Strategy Network said the survey shows that consumers are using multiple channels to get information.

"It forces communicators to develop a broad marketing mix," he added.

The survey also uncovered an apparent disconnect between corporate communicators and consumers, especially where corporate Web sites are concerned. For example, 60% of industry professionals will use the company Web site to post a corporate announcement, but barely 7% of consumers look to corporate Web sites for that information.

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