Malaria No More unites public, private sectors

WASHINGTON: Malaria No More (MNM) - a newly formed network of NGOs, foundations, corporations, and faith-based groups - was scheduled to announce a public-private partnership to support a comprehensive approach to end the disease at this week's White House Summit on Malaria.

WASHINGTON: Malaria No More (MNM) - a newly formed network of NGOs, foundations, corporations, and faith-based groups - was scheduled to announce a public-private partnership to support a comprehensive approach to end the disease at this week's White House Summit on Malaria.

ViaNovo is handling media relations and strategic communications for the non-profit associated with the high-profile White House Summit. Scott Case, VP of marketing and business development for MNM, said the summit provided the ideal opportunity for substantial media outreach for the fledgling non-profit.

In June 2005, President Bush announced The President's Malaria Initiative (PMI), a five-year, $1.2 billion program that encouraged the private sector to join government efforts in combating malaria. MNM is a response to that initiative, bringing a number of organizations and corporations in to work with the public sector.

Initially, Case said the organization would concentrate on using partners' networks - made up of both employees and customers - to run specifically targeted campaigns. Partners include United Way of America, the Global Business Council, and the American Red Cross.

As part of the campaign MNM has begun offering donors the chance to purchase insecticide-laced bed nets for $10 for children and families in the regions of Africa most affected by the mosquito-borne disease.

That effort is being supported by online posters and PSAs based around the slogan "One Bed Net. $10. Save a Life." The group is currently relying on the online campaign, including posting the PSAs on You Tube.

"We have two objectives from an outreach standpoint," Case said. "Get the message out that we can do something about this disease and that $10 can save someone's life. And second, we'd like to make malaria the number one humanitarian story."

In addition to publicizing the disease in developed countries, the organization is also pursuing increased education on the ground in areas hit hardest by malaria. Case noted that people in these countries need to be taught how to use the bed nets effectively and how to reduce contact with mosquitoes.

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