Traditional outlets using video as part of story package

In all of the hullabaloo in the PR world surrounding the explosion of YouTube and other community-posting sites, what has become lost is that traditional print media outlets also increasingly have a need for video content.

In all of the hullabaloo in the PR world surrounding the explosion of YouTube and other community-posting sites, what has become lost is that traditional print media outlets also increasingly have a need for video content.

"The reality is all of these community platforms are platforms that work on the principle of survival of the fittest," says Shoba Purushothaman, CEO and cofounder of The NewsMarket. "It's like putting it into a giant superstore - unless someone is looking for it, they are not going to find it. What PR people should be looking at is a lot of the mainstream print titles - whether it's BusinessWeek or The Wall Street Journal - that are all using video content."

With print journalists more adept at the interactive possibilities to a story, PR practitioners pitching a story no longer have to make multiple stops when dealing with various mediums.

Most important, of course, the content needs to further the story, says Bob Leverone, VP of TV for Dow Jones Online. When The Wall Street Journal ran a story on Lexus' self-parking car recently, the online version simply carried the automaker's video content showing the car parking itself.

But journalists are also getting more comfortable shooting interviews themselves, he said.

Larry Thomas, COO of Medialink, notes a recent case where a local TV station encouraged one of its clients to continue sending footage, even though they weren't seeing it on the station. It turns out that the station was re-editing b-roll footage and posting it online.

"That opened up a lot of eyes," Thomas says. "We had a situation where they aren't able to use the video we were sending, but online you don't have those time or space restrictions you have on air."

That, he says, is forcing PR pros to think about the whole package.

"What you're beginning to see is PR people looking to create video as part of their storytelling process, as opposed to saying, 'I need to get some video to go along with this press release,'" adds Purushothaman.

Key points:

Traditional print media are increasingly using video content to advance stories online

TV stations sometimes will post un-aired b-roll footage on their Web sites

PR pros are beginning to use the entire package of content when talking with traditional print journalists

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