Radi education push touts PressureWire to doctors

BOSTON: As the debate surrounding the future of medical stents continues to pick up steam, Radi Medical Systems has kicked off a major education campaign for its PressureWire device, intended to help doctors determine whether stents are required in a given patient.

BOSTON: As the debate surrounding the future of medical stents continues to pick up steam, Radi Medical Systems has kicked off a major education campaign for its PressureWire device, intended to help doctors determine whether stents are required in a given patient.

Russo Partners was brought on to handle the national communications effort in July and will begin by reaching out to cardiologists and payers to explain the benefits of measuring coronary artery pressure when determining whether stents are necessary.

Radi's device allows cardiologists to perform a three- to five-minute process after an angiogram that can determine whether the situation requires stenting.

"It's the right time for Radi to focus on educating the medical community, as well as the payers, about the advantages of performing a simple test in the cath lab that leads, ultimately, to a better outcome for the patients," said David Schull, MD of Russo Partners.

Russo will handle media relations and marketing communications for the Swedish company and will begin its education campaign with the TCT 2007 (Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics) symposium in Washington, DC.

In addition to attending major medical community events, the company, Schull noted, will reach out to regional, national, and trade publications to explain how the new device works and why it is a significant improvement on existing technology.

"Our primary focus now is on using some of the important data that has come out that show that stents are not always necessary for placement," Schull said.

Radi's American operations are run out of Wilmington, MA, and the company also recently launched a Web-based training tool that's focused exclusively on myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFR).

TeachFFR.com provides cardiologists, technicians, and nurses with access to lectures and interactive cases in order to demonstrate the versatility of FFR and its importance in providing physicians with 100% accuracy in identifying which coronary artery lesions require treatment.

The campaigns are ongoing, with Russo's work beginning last month, Schull said.

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