Bugging out

One team's reason for losing the American League Divisional Series is another company's marketing opportunity. And so is the case of the now infamous Midges...

One team's reason for losing the American League Divisional Series is another company's marketing opportunity. And so is the case of the now infamous Midges incident that occurred during game two of the American league Divisional Series between the New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians. Midges are tiny gnat like creatures that breed on the outskirts of lakes during warm fall weather, and unfortunately for the Yankees and their young pitching phenom Joba Chamberlain a few million of these annoying insects decided to make an appearance during the bottom half of the eighth inning of game two at Jacobs Field in Cleveland (the midges had been flying around for a few innings but seemed to swarm Chamberlain while on the mound causing the usually pinpoint accurate pitcher to uncork two wild pitches allowing the Indians to tie the game).

So during last night's American League Championship Series game between the Indians and the Boston Red Sox, the first game back at Jacobs Field since Midgegate, United Industries, the maker of Cutter insect repellent products, had someone outside the stadium dressed as a bee handing out bug repellent wipes. "We’re keeping the midges on the mound," said Stephanie Strawbridge, the bee outside the stadium. "That’s our secret weapon."

During the seventh inning of last night's game Fox, who was broadcasting the game, showed footage of Strawbridge handing out the wipes and then had one of its on-field correspondents hold up one of the packets and talk about what it was. TVWeek recently reported that Fox was asking $200,000 per spot for those games.

As a side note the Indians did win the game taking a two games to one lead in the series. And there were no midges in sight.

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