High Court tackles indecency 30 years after 'Seven Dirty Words'

Three decades after the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment does not ban the federal government from regulating on-air speech, the justices allowed the Federal Communications Commission to defend its decision to fine networks for curse words.

Three decades after the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment does not ban the federal government from regulating on-air speech, the justices allowed the Federal Communications Commission to defend its decision to fine networks for curse words. A federal appeals court ruled last year against the FCC's attempt to institute stricter policies. The major networks have said there are safeguards in place to prevent the planned use of indecent speech, especially when children are awake. But are the justices aware of DVRs, or even VCRs?

In focus: Moves of the newspaper titans

The New York Times Co. reached an agreement with Harbinger Capital Partners and Firebrand Partners to allow two outside board members for the first time since the company went public more than 40 years ago. Meanwhile, owner Sam Zell told Baltimore Sun staffers that Tribune Co. may reevaluate its decision to keep all of its media properties. Craig Dubow, Gannett president and CEO, received a 36% raise while his company's stock value plummeted.

Also:

Let the “termination” jokes begin. Maria Shriver was paid an annual sum of between $100,000 and $1 million for the past three years as part of her exit agreement with NBC.

Sports fans, rejoice. Sports Illustrated is launching SI Vault, an online database of 150,000 articles and 500,000 photos used since the magazine's 1954 launch.

Goodbye, Harp magazine.

Hello, Slate financial site The Big Money.

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