Vivacious Versace's

When it comes to branding, the Versace's are all over the map. While Donatella, trademarked by her bold look and iconic visibility, talks business and purple luggage, her brother Santo talks politics.

When it comes to branding, the Versace's are all over the map. While Donatella, trademarked by her bold look and iconic visibility, talks business and purple luggage, her brother Santo talks politics.

According to the Telegraph, Santo Versace, the firm's chairman, will compete with a porn star and the grandson of the last king of Italy in the country's general election next month. “The use of eclectic candidates is a common campaign tactic in Italy.”

He's running for Parliament as a candidate in former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's Partito delle Libertà party, representing Calabria, the town where he and his siblings were born, reports WWD. According to the story, Versace has “become increasingly more vocal on matters concerning social issues and has often urged his peers to shake up the political status quo.”

Should he fail to “shake up the status quo,” he can still splay his family name across the sky. The lux label unveiled new, Versace-designed helicopters manufactured by AugustaWestland.

The helicopter launch came just after a launch party for the brand's menswear at Barneys, starring Donatella. “A cocktail party held in her honor becomes a mega-happening, inspiring one of the more eclectic and dynamic set of guests than your average store party,” reports Fashion Wire Daily.

‘No one will read that anyway'
Scott Schuman, author and photographer of fashion photography blog, The Sartorialist, recounts - below the Mar 18th image of a tiny bottle of vetiver oil - his botched interview with a woman from The Times of India during his stay in New Delhi. He writes, “…the article is made up of bits and pieces of things I said, taken out of context, and jumbled together as one long quote.” When Schuman confronted the reporter, she responded, “No one will read that anyway.”

Banana Republic
On Thurs, Banana Republic opened its first store in London, and War on Want generated the press. The nonprofit organization, campaigning for ethical practices in the fashion industry, picketed the opening. The protest was linked to investigation and report by the Guardian alleging that the chain, under the Gap umbrella, relies on cheap Indian labor - people who work 70 hours a week for as little as 15p an hour.

Who isn't a celebrity these days?
The New York Times compares the influence of makeup artists in the beauty industry to the influence of chefs in the restaurant business.

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