Tube creator has new use for canister

EGYPTIANS BURIED pharaohs in elaborate sarcophagi with gold and jewels to take to the afterlife. Fancy indeed, but when you're Fredric Baur, creator of the nifty Pringles potato crisp container, an empty snack tube seems a much cozier place to spend eternity.

Egyptians buried pharaohs in elaborate sarcophagi with gold and jewels to take to the afterlife. Fancy indeed, but when you're Fredric Baur, creator of the nifty Pringles potato crisp container, an empty snack tube seems a much cozier place to spend eternity.

Baur's children honored his final request by placing part of his cremated ashes in the Pringles container he invented in order to bury it beside an urn with his remains. Baur received the patent for the snack-packaging container in 1970 and worked for P&G until he retired in the 1980s, the AP reported.

Americans probably recognize Pringles as much for its signature tubular packaging as they do for the actual snacks, a curve-shaped chip. Now the container has brought posthumous notoriety to the man who considered it one of his proudest life achievements. News stories from around the world took note of Baur's unique send-off. For the Pringles' brand, having consumers read reports of human remains in its canisters might not be ideal, but with this final nod to his beloved Pringles tube, Baur guaranteed his place in history.

PR Play Rating
 1. Clueless
 2. Ill-advised
 3. On the right track
 4. Savvy
 5. Ingenious

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