Managing corporate reputation key driver to success

ROCHESTER, NY: Corporate image continues to slide in the eyes of the American public, but firms with an effective overall reputation management program climb ahead, according to the recently released Harris Interactive Reputation Quotient (RQ) survey.

ROCHESTER, NY: Corporate image continues to slide in the eyes of the American public, but firms with an effective overall reputation management program climb ahead, according to the recently released Harris Interactive Reputation Quotient (RQ) survey.

About 71% of consumers have a poor general opinion of corporate America, and the reputations of seven out of eleven industries declined from the time of the previous survey.

 

“Companies that do reputation management are the ones that end up getting the great reputation,” said Robert Fronk, SVP, senior consultant, reputation strategy at Harris Interactive, while the companies that are struggling typically do not have strategic planning for corporate reputation built into their business models.

He noted the examples of FedEx (number 12 overall) and Johnson & Johnson (number two) as companies that have been at or near the top 10 for past nine years of the survey, by building business strategies around issues important to the general public and attuned to their bottom-line.

The way a corporation treats its employees also factors in to how consumers perceive companies, Fronk noted, pointing out that Google captured the number one spot aided by its well-known “20 percent time” where workers can focus on projects not necessarily in their job descriptions.

Google, which edged out last year's winner, Microsoft, as well as Johnson & Johnson, which ruled from 1999-2006, scored first or second in all reputation drivers, including financial performance, vision/leadership, social responsibility, and workplace environment

The annual study surveyed more than 20,000 people to rank the 60 most identifiable companies according to consumer's perception of them. It found that a good rep strongly correlates to the likelihood that consumers will purchase, recommend, or invest in a company or its products.

Other top spots went to Intel Corp. (3) and General Mills (4), while Halliburton ranked lowest, and Citigo Oil (59) and Northwest (58) rounded out the bottom.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in